There are loads of things you can do around home that can make a big difference to the environment. Like everything else here, they’re not a big deal. Small changes that if we all do, can start reversing a whole lot. 


Plastic bags

Don't recycle plastic bags

Why it’s fucked

Don’t put your recycling in plastic bags and into your recycling box/bin. Recycling workers don’t sort them, they clog up the machines and make what you recycled pointless because it gets tossed into the rubbish pile and into landfill. 

Change one thing

Most supermarkets have recycling stations for plastic bags. Use them. You can still collect recycling in a plastic bag, but toss it all from the bag straight into the bin. Then reuse the bag again. And again and again...you got it. 


Shorter showers

Shorter showers

Why it’s fucked

An average ten minute shower wastes around 75–190 litres of water. And seeing as though most of us don’t roll around naked in mud everyday, long showers are a rather unnecessary waste of water and energy.  

Change one thing

You guessed it, cut down on long showers. The recommended time is under four minutes, so set a timer or buy one. You could even buy a water efficient shower head. Oh, and don’t brush your teeth in there, that’s valuable soaping time. 


Washing

Wash in ccccold

Why it’s fucked

About three-quarters of the energy and greenhouse gas emissions from washing a load of laundry comes from heating the water. Unless you’re seriously soiling your undies, there’s no reason why you should be washing with hot water.

Change one thing

Put your washing machine setting onto cold and the quickest washing cycle available. Your clothes will still come out smelling of Hawaiian sunsets and you’ll have significantly cut your energy use.  In winter, minimise your use of the dryer, it’s money and energy zapper. 


Be a binner not a blocker

Be a binner not a blocker

Why it's fucked

In OZ and NZ, we use around 700 million tampons per year. In the UK it's 1 billion and the US, 20 billion. Unfortunately, there's more than a few of us guilty of flushing them down the toilet. The trouble is, they don't break down in water. Instead, they clog your drain and if they get through, they either end up incinerated, in landfill or washed up in the sea or rivers. Gross.

Change one thing

If there isn't a sanitary bin, wrap your tampons up in toilet paper and put them in the bin. Buy organic tampons that have no nasty chemicals sprayed onto the cotton, synthetics or excess plastic packaging. It's good for the environment and even better for our bodies. And if you want to adventure out further, try a Mooncup or something similar.